Fluency Expectations

Fluency Recommendations

Fluency Recommendations


A/F
M
N-Q
F-BF.3
Students should look at algebraic manipulation as a meaningful enterprise, in which they seek to understand the structure of an expression or equation and use properties to transform it into forms that provide useful information (e.g., features of a function or solutions to an equation). This perspective will help students continue to usefully apply their mathematical knowledge in a range of situations, whether their continued study leads them toward college or career readiness.
Seeing mathematics as a tool to model real-world situations should be an underlying perspective in everything students do, including writing algebraic expressions, creating functions, creating geometric models and understanding statistical relationships. This perspective will help students appreciate the importance of mathematics as they continue their study of it.
In particular, students should recognize that much of mathematics is concerned with understanding quantities and their relationships. They should pick appropriate units for quantities being modeled, using them as a guide to understand a situation, and be attentive to the level of accuracy that is reported in a solution.
Students should understand the effects of parameter changes and be able to apply them to create a rule modeling the function.

Fluency Recommendations

Fluency Recommendations


x+4

x+3
as
 x+4

 x+3


(x+3)+1

   x+3


1
+
   1

  x+3
A-APR.6
A-SSE.2
F-IF.3
This standard sets an expectation that students will divide polynomials with remainder by inspection in simple cases. For example, one can view the rational expression
The ability to see structure in expressions and to use this structure to rewrite expressions is a key skill in everything from advanced factoring (e.g., grouping) to summing series to the rewriting of rational expressions to examine the end behavior of the corresponding rational function.
Fluency in translating between recursive definitions and closed forms is helpful when dealing with many problems involving sequences and series, with applications ranging from fitting functions to tables to problems in finance.

Fluency Expectations or Examples of Culminating Standards

8.EE.7Students have been working informally with one-variable linear equations since as early as kindergarten. This important line of development culminates in grade 8 with the solution of general one-variable linear equations, including cases with infinitely many solutions or no solutions as well as cases requiring algebraic manipulation using properties of operations. Coefficients and constants in these equations may be any rational numbers.
8.G.9When students learn to solve problems involving volumes of cones, cylinders, and spheres — together with their previous grade 7 work in angle measure, area, surface area and volume (7.G.4-6) — they will have acquired a well-developed set of geometric measurement skills. These skills, along with proportional reasoning (7.RP) and multistep numerical problem solving (7.EE.3), can be combined and used in flexible ways as part of modeling during high school — not to mention after high school for college and careers.[1]


[1] See “Appendix A: Lasting Achievements in K-8.”

Fluency Expectations or Examples of Culminating Standards

7.EE.3Students solve multistep problems posed with positive and negative rational numbers in any form (whole numbers, fractions, and decimals), using tools strategically. This work is the culmination of many progressions of learning in arithmetic, problem solving and mathematical practices.
7.EE.4In solving word problems leading to one-variable equations of the form px + q = r and p(x + q) = r, students solve the equations fluently. This will require fluency with rational number arithmetic (7.NS.1-3), as well as fluency to some extent with applying properties operations to rewrite linear expressions with rational coefficients (7.EE.1).
7.NS.1Adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing rational numbers is the culmination of numerical work with the four basic operations. The number system will continue to develop in grade 8, expanding to become the real numbers by the introduction of irrational numbers, and will develop further in high school, expanding to become the complex numbers with the introduction of imaginary numbers. Because there are no specific standards for rational number arithmetic in later grades and because so much other work in grade 7 depends on rational number arithmetic (see below), fluency with rational number arithmetic should be the goal in grade 7.

 

Fluency Expectations or Examples of Culminating Standards

6.NS.2Students fluently divide multidigit numbers using the standard algorithm. This is the culminating standard for several years’ worth of work with division of whole numbers.
6.NS.3Students fluently add, subtract, multiply, and divide multidigit decimals using the standard algorithm for each operation. This is the culminating standard for several years’ worth of work relating to the domains of Number and Operations in Base Ten, Operations and Algebraic Thinking, and Number and Operations — Fractions.
6.NS.1Students interpret and compute quotients of fractions and solve word problems involving division of fractions by fractions. This completes the extension of operations to fractions.

 

Fluency Expectations or Examples of Culminating Standards

5.NBT.5Students fluently multiply multidigit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

Fluency Expectations or Examples of Culminating Standards

4.NBT.4Students fluently add and subtract multidigit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

Fluency Expectations or Examples of Culminating Standards

3.OA.7Students fluently multiply and divide within 100. By the end of grade 3, they know all products of two one-digit numbers from memory.
3.NBT.2Students fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. (Although 3.OA.7 and 3.NBT.2 are both fluency standards, these two standards do not represent equal investments of time in grade 3. Note that students in grade 2 were already adding and subtracting within 1000, just not fluently. That makes 3.NBT.2 a relatively small and incremental expectation. By contrast, multiplication and division are new in grade 3, and meeting the multiplication and division fluency standard 3.OA.7 with understanding is a major portion of students’ work in grade 3.)
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